Gatorade to Go Organic … Why It’s Still Not a Healthy Option

By Michelle Schoffro Cook

The neon-colored Gatorade loved by many sports enthusiasts will soon be available as an

organic

option. PepsiCo Incorporated announced that it will soon launch its new organic Gatorade throughout the U.S. The company’s strawberry, mixed berry and lemon beverages have already been tested for consumer interest in some Kroger Co. supermarkets.


Gatorade

But how healthy will it be? Based on the U.S. Department of Agriculture organic certification, the beverage will definitely be a step up from its additive-laden counterpart, but it still won’t be a healthy beverage option for anyone looking to fuel up after a workout … or for anyone else for that matter.

Gatorade has long been criticized by nutrition experts because of its less-than-healthy

ingredients

, which in a traditional bottle of the beverage include:

“Water, Sugar, Natural Flavors, Citric Acid, Salt, Sodium Citrate, Monopotassium Phosphate, Sucralose, Acesulfame Potassium and Color”

The

organic Gatorade

ingredients include:

“Water, Organic Cane Sugar, Citric Acid, Organic Natural Flavor, Sea Salt, Sodium Citrate and Potassium Chloride”

The move away from sucralose, which goes by the brand name of

Splenda

, is definitely an improvement as sucralose has been linked to many serious health concerns, ranging from anxiety and allergies to headaches and weight gain. Sucralose is a chlorinated artificially-created sweetener, despite what the manufacturer may claim. So, PepsiCo Inc. gets one star for removing this undesirable ingredient.

The company also gets another star for eliminating colors which have been linked to many diseases and for the move from “

Natural Flavors

” to “Organic Natural Flavors” since the latter is much more restrictive. Both of these ingredients can include many less-than-desirable components, such as dried beaver’s sac, sheepskin excretions or insect excretions, but the term “organic natural flavors” at least minimizes possible unwanted ingredients like solvents and pesticide residues.

And, while Monopotassium Phosphate and Acesulfame Potassium may sound like harmless minerals—they are not. While the study results have been controversial, the latter substance has a dubious reputation as

being linked to cancer

. So PepsiCo gets another star for making the switch to potassium chloride.

But, organic Gatorade falls short when it comes to the amount of sugar found in each bottle. That’s because every 16.9-ounce bottle contains a

whopping 29 grams of sugar

. No health expert or nutritionist could claim that this constitutes a safe amount of sugar because it is excessive, particularly for any beverage company that claims it is a healthy post-workout option for rehydration.


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Out of a possible 5-star rating, I couldn’t give organic Gatorade more than 3 stars due to its high amount of sugar. While there are definitely some improvements to the product over its predecessor, it’s still not a healthy option and is best avoided.

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